BIO
Sujin Lee
1978. South Korea

MA (Performance Studies) and MFA (Studio Art), New York University. 
BFA (Fine Arts), Maryland Institute College of Art

EXHIBITIONS
Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Exhibition venues include Arko Art Center, Seoul; A.I.R. Gallery, NY; Union College, NY; AC Institute, NY; Kumho Museum of Art, Seoul; The Queens Museum, NY; and The Bronx Museum of the Arts, NY. 

RESIDENCIES
2012-2013 A.I.R. Gallery Fellowship
2016 SeMA Emerging Artist Grant.
She was awarded artist residencies from the Millay Colony for the Arts, Blue Mountain Center, I-Park, Newark Museum, and Zarya Center for Contemporary Art. 
Artist in the Marketplace program at the Bronx Museum of the Arts and the Emerge Program at Aljira. 
    

Sujin Lee

RESIDENCIES

Language Requireent

29.10.2018 to 23.11.2018



Sujin Lee is an artist working with text, video, and performance. She makes questions related to the emotional, ideological and identity aspects that are affected given the fact that she is a Korean artists working mainly in English. 
She thinks about the inevitable loss that the act of translation implies, the pain of a translator. Which relation of duration exists between the written and spoken language? To support her own research she will interview local artists who experience similar situations. 

ARTIST'S STATEMENT

Language is the subject and medium of my work. I am very interested in speaking as a physical act; it is an act of making a sound (which is ephemeral) through the body. I use time-based media such as video and performance to discuss language in relation to time or duration. Time-based media allow me to highlight the elements of spoken text—accents, durations, emotions, hesitations, and mistakes. I pay attention to how
these elements are expressed, negotiated, translated and documented in written forms.
I often play with the “un-synchronicity” and tensions that occur in translations between spoken text and written text. Through my work, I investigate, contemplate, and perform the “language space” around me—which is elusive, complex, limited, expansive, and sometimes contradictory.