BIO
SARAH KNILL-JONES
Born in United Kingdom
Lives in RJ, Brazil

2010 MA CAMBERWELL COLLEGE OF ART(London, UK)
1991 BA GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART(Scotland)

Solo Exhibitions
2015 The (Dis-)appearing Woman,Museum of Modern Art,Baku,Azerbaijan
2010 Perceptions, MiM Centre of Contemporary Art,Azerbaijan
2008 Metamorphosis, Norway.
Selected Group Exhibitions
2017 This Year’s Model, Studio 1.1 London, UK 
2016 Editions, Tripp Gallery, London/Looking Up, Studio 1.1, London UK/Open Exhibition, Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh UK.

Awards
2014 Threadneedle Prize finalist

Residencies
2014 Trelex Residency, Switzerland
2017 Despina Residency, Brasil. 
Collections
Museum of Modern Art, Baku, Azerbaijan/Victoria & Albert Museum, Contemporary Textiles Archive/Public Collection University of Northampton 

Sarah Knill-Jones

RESIDENCIES

Rayuela

29.03.2019 to 26.04.2019



My most recent cycle of work has been inspired by Clarice Lispector’s novel ‘The Passion According to G.H.’ The singular nature of her writing is close to that of James Joyce (whose Ulysses has inspired a previous body of work) but Lispector’s prose is infused with the culture and philosophy of Brazil, where I currently live. The last few months I have focused on monoprints, which give great freedom, but within certain technical restraints, and I would like to push the medium further. I’m particularly happy to spend time in Buenos Aires, understand more about Argentina, and draw on the great Julio Cortazar's 'Rayuela' for inspiration.

A line of thought which traces connections between my French and British nationalities, my temporary place of residence in Rio and the language and culture of Argentina. I use the prose of Cortazar as a starting point, to look backwards in order to look forwards in my practice as an artist. 

As the character Oliveira says in Rayuela: The same thing happens to everybody, the statue of Janus is a useless waste, the truth is that after forty years of age we have our real face on the back of our heads, looking desperately backwards. It is what in all truth is called a commonplace. You can’t do anything about it, that’s about the strength of it.