The Nylon Korea Magazine published in its February issue this interview to Magdalena Surany about her residence in ' ace.

When she was asked to described her experiences at ' ace in a single word she stated:
"The word I choose to describe the atmosphere at Proyecto'ACE is one of my favorite terms in the dictionary: 'Progressive'."

TIP:
Magdalena' s recommendations to enjoy a residency anywhere in the world:
"Know your limitations and realize a work plan that will be adequate for the period of time and the kind of art you want to make in that particular residency. Be open-minded, experiment, research and learn from the culture that you are about to immerse yourself in.  Last but not least, always eat the food that you are offered and with no hesitation. You shall be pleasantly surprised."

Nylon Korea

PUBLICATIONS

Residencias

02.02.2011

Magdalena Suranyi was born in Buenos Aires (1987), Argentina. She has lived in London for the past 8 years. She was artist in residence at  'ace in December 2010. Her work was concentrated in a short but very fruitful and intense time for both the artist and those from ; ace team who work with she.

INTERVIEW


1.     Which artist-residency do you stay? 
I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina (living in London for the past 8 years) and participated in a printmaking residency called Proyecto'ACE based in the same city.

2.     Please introduce your art work.
I am a painter, performer, printmaker and installation artist living in London since 2003. The major motivation behind my work lies in the visual understanding of global patterns of violence which are often intrinsic to gendered hierarchies of power. I work largely with 'taboo' subjects that carry with them important psychological as well as sociological significance, then find ways to re-introduce them to the public through a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. The ultimate goal is, and will always remain, to raise awareness and encourage an exchange of ideas and emotions about issues that would normally be swept under the proverbial carpet. 

3.     How long have you been staying there so far?
My residency was short and sweet, it lasted 8 days in December 2010.

4.     Why did you decide to come to the artist residency and what process did you need to enter?
I had already made plans to come to Buenos Aires to visit family, but wanted to arrive earlier to find a platform for an intensive work experience at a printmaking studio and carry on developing my latest project while I was out of the country. In my case, I had already known a little bit about the residency from online research and made a call to see if there was any availability in the particular timeframe that I was going to stay in Argentina. I was rather lucky because they did have the time and the space that I needed and immediately asked me to fill out the application form with my intentions for the residency. My proposal was later turned into a work plan for the 8 days that I was going to spend in the studio. I was able to finance my stay through private funding and accommodation, however, with more time, it is always possible to apply for funding from other organizations independent of this residency and use the accommodation that they can provide.
               
5.     What are you working on at the residence?
With the help and excellent guidance of Alicia Candiani (founder and director), Adriana Moracci (master-printer) and Valeria Zamparolo (workshop assistant) I successfully completed 5 hand-made editions of a 52 pg. artist book using the latest technology in photo-lithography and rubber-based ink, all of which was done in less than a week. The theme of the book is about systematic forms of child abuse and institutional cover-ups in the hands of the Catholic Church. It is also the direct product of a previous interactive installation named "THE DEVIL IS AT WORKS INSIDE THE VATICAN" which consisted of 200 drawings spread on top of a toddler's bed, with a standard Catholic cross hanging above it, blessed by Pope Benedict XVI. The audience had access to the drawings at all times, they were allowed to sit on the bed and touch every single image if it pleased them. The viewer's interaction with the drawings, a subjective reaction within a very public sphere, was documented by both CCTV cameras and hand held camcorders. For the residency, I wanted to make a book with a selection of these compositions, where the same concept of careful handling and responsibility for acquired knowledge is applied at all times. I called the book "STUPRATTOR" a misspelled variation of the Latin word 'stupprator', also the origin of a common legal term which means: 'Man who prefers virgins.' The main idea was to create a series of mock-books that I could later propose to publishers and make more editions with the purpose of raising awareness and eventually funds for specialist children's charities.

6.     Do the environment of the city and the residence influence on your work?
Argentina is mainly a Roman Catholic country that sticks rigorously to the sayings of the Vatican City, it is a country that follows the strict dogma and official opinion of the Church, which in turn still has the power to veto a legal decision. Such is reflected in the countrywide ban on abortion as well as the strong opposition and divided opinion on recently legalized gay marriage and adoption. This gave the project a sense of weight and purpose that would probably not be present in the context of another more secular country. Also, as in any nation with such contradictions, it allowed me to get in touch with native kindred spirits that had matching creative and political objectives. The environment influenced the project in such a direct way that it affected even the material and format of the book itself. For example,  for the first 5 editions, we used original children's school notebooks that to any Argentine national is an instantly recognizable brand and icon, therefore a trigger of childhood memories specific to the country where the residency took place. 

7.     What is the best about working and staying at an artist residency?

My experience of artist residencies has been extremely fruitful and productive. This is especially the case when collaborating with people that you barely know. You have to quickly learn to adjust not only to the facilities and the time that are available in a given space, but also to the way other creative practitioners work around you and how you can apply their ideas to your art without compromising your own vision. I have been lucky enough, through these residencies, to make many contacts and friends that tend to last the test of time and allow projects to continue within and out of the place where they first originated. 

8.     You are away from your home. What do you miss the most about your hometown? (It could be anything. A person, habit, and a shop etc.) 

When I am away from London, the habit I miss the most are my afternoon walks in the park with my bulldog, Olek. A lot of important decision-making happens during these peaceful walks. 

9.     Could you describe the atmosphere as a word?

The word I choose to describe the atmosphere at Proyecto'ACE is one of my favorite terms in the dictionary: 'Progressive'.

10.   What would you advice to young Korean people who want to go abroad for an artist-in-residence?

Know your limitations and realize a work plan that will be adequate for the period of time and the kind of art you want to make in that particular residency.
Be open-minded, experiment, research and learn from the culture that you are about to immerse yourself in. 
Last but not least, always eat the food that you are offered and with no hesitation. You shall be pleasantly surprised.

11.   What’s your plan after the session of this residence?

I will be returning to London with the original lithographic plates to continue working on this project by making more editions in a UK printmaking studio, produce and exhibit as much as physically possible and hopefully get my artist book published in 2011. All upcoming events and major developments concerning 'STUPRATTOR' as well as the rest of my portfolio can be found online HERE.